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Too Cool to be Forgotten

I thought Alex Robinson’s Too Cool to be Forgotten would be a quick read. For me it wasn’t. It never grabbed me so it took a couple weeks to finish.

In Too Cool to be Forgotten a middle aged man who’s getting cancer treatment undergoes hypnosis and is transported back to his sophomore year of high school. He sees this as weird, but also a chance to refuse an offer of a cigarette at a party and thus possibly undo his lung cancer. While back in time, he often tries to share his adult insights with his peers, but his pearls of wisdom are ignored.

While there were some interesting parts, the book was too gloomy for me, but many enjoy that vibe. I’m not that interested in high school anymore so the book left me cold.

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2021 in graphic novel

 

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The Great Good Thing

klavanAndrew Klavan’s memoir, The Great Good Thing: A Secular Jew Comes to Faith in Christ is a great read. Klavan goes back to his youth growing up in the suburbs of Long Island with a mom who was atheist and a father who was culturally, but not religiously Jewish. He chronicles his rocky relationship with his father and his love of writing and reading stories. It’s easy to see that Klavan was a storyteller from his earliest days. What’s more it’s shown in the writing. The Great Good Thing is masterfully written. Now an accomplished novelist and screenwriter, Klavan knows how to make every word and every metaphor count. He’s a delight to read.

This memoir isn’t preachy or saccharine. Instead, Klavan shares how he slowly came to be baptizes after dealing with the demons and mistakes of his early life. He doesn’t portray himself as a saint. He isn’t proud of his rebellion at school. He doesn’t sugarcoat his struggles with depression or anger. He trenchantly describes how anti-semitism plagued him and for years was a barrier to Christianity for him. ¬†Instead he gives us a smart, open look at one very intelligent guy’s slow turning to faith. While doing so he offers a road map to deeper understanding of theology and scripture.

Because Klavan’s writing so good, I’ve ordered one of his novels to read next. (By “next” I mean after I’ve finished the eight books I’ve already started.)

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2019 in book review, Christianity, contemporary, memoir

 

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Fetch

fetch

I want to know more about graphic novels and non-fiction, so I checked out Nichole George’s Fetch: How a Bad Dog Brought Me Home. Reading this story of George’s life with her ill behaved, but loyal and interesting dog, Beija. When she was a teen, Georges got Beija from a shelter. Beija had been abused and came with a lot of sensitivities. She’d bite people who bent down to pet her. She didn’t like men, and on and on. Originally, George’s bought the dog for a boyfriend, but his mother said “no” to this gift so Beija becomes George’s dog, sometimes shared with her boyfriend while they’re together.

The story is a chronicle of George’s life as she moves in with her boyfriend, finishes high school, moves out on her own with him and continues to move in search of a home where she and her dog can find peace and understanding.

I found the book interesting and Beija and Georges interesting and likable. I did think the ending dragged a bit, but the story was entertaining and endearing.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2018 in book review, graphic memoir, memoir

 

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