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Category Archives: humor

The Code of the Woosters

th-8I’m loving the audio books of P.G. Wodehouse’s Jeeves series. This week I listened to The Code of the Woosters where Bertie’s aunt Dahlia forces him to track down an ugly cow creamer that his uncle is obsessed with. This leads to an amazingly comic odyssey in the British countryside.

Here are a few of the thousands of great quotations:

“I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled.”

“It was a silver cow. But when I say ‘cow’, don’t go running away with the idea of some decent, self-respecting cudster such as you may observe loading grass into itself in the nearest meadow. This was a sinister, leering, Underworld sort of animal, the kind that would spit out of the side of its mouth for twopence.”

“I mean, imagine how some unfortunate Master Criminal would feel, on coming down to do a murder at the old Grange, if he found that not only was Sherlock Holmes putting in the weekend there, but Hercule Poirot, as well.”

“I suppose even Dictators have their chummy moments, when they put their feet up and relax with the boys, but it was plain from the outset that if Roderick Spode had a sunnier side, he had not come with any idea of exhibiting it now. His manner was curt. One sensed the absence of the bonhomous note.”

“I couldn’t have made a better shot, if I had been one of those detectives who see a chap walking along the street and deduce that he is a retired manufacturer of poppet valves named Robinson with rheumatism in one arm, living at Clapham.

The book’s delightful from start to finish. How does Wodehouse do it?

He’s a comic genius if ever there was one.

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Posted by on March 19, 2018 in British Lit, British literature, fiction, humor, postaweek

 

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2018 Reading Challenge

stack-of-books-1001655_1280

I’ve made up a reading challenge for myself. I have done Goodreads.com‘s challenges where I read a certain number of books per month. This time I’m adding some themes and other specifics to spice things up.

Susan’s 2018 Reading Challenge

January – read a memoir and another book that’ll help me change my outlook (i.e. achieve a resolution)

February – read a 19th century novel and a religious book

March – read a book written by a Russian author

April – read a play by Shakespeare and commentary in a Norton Classic edition

May – read a detective story

June – read a book of historical fiction

July – read a travel book

August – read a humorous book

September – read a book by a Japanese author

October – read something scary

November – read a book a friend has recommended

December – read a children’s book and a story or book with a Christmas theme

 
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Posted by on January 1, 2018 in book lovers, British Lit, British literature, Children's Lit, fiction, French Lit, humor, non-fiction, play, Travel Writing

 

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A Worrier’s Guide to Life

worriers-guide-to-life-gemma-correll

Full of comics simply drawn and clever, A Worrier’s Guide to Life is a fun, quick read. It is a little on the negative side, but so much of American humor is sarcastic or snarky, so I’m used to it, though I’ve become less so. Nonetheless Correll is clearly perceptive and funny. Her simple drawings have charm. It’s a book to get at the library for a quick read.

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2017 in humor

 

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Clever

I hope this catches on!

 

 
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Posted by on September 10, 2014 in humor

 

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Librarian Interview

Remember Monty Python? For my summer Library Science course. Evidently, there will be some fun along with the staggering workload.

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2013 in contemporary, humor

 

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Exploring with David Sedaris

A cute video with David Sedaris.

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2013 in book lovers, contemporary, humor

 

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A Christmas Carol

Charles Dickens: A Christmas Carol. In Prose. ...

 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

December’s book club choice was Dicken’s A Christmas Carol. I’d never read the story, but had seen soooo many plays, cartoons and films that I felt I knew the story inside out. In fact, I do, but I was delighted by how Dicken’s prose is ever-fresh. Reading A Christmas Carol was pure delight. The words, characters and tone delight. Dicken’s immediately created an insider bond with me. Reading the book far exceeded the pleasure of any of the films or plays I’d seen, though each production entertained me.

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2012 in British Lit, classic, fiction, humor

 

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